ROAD NEWS: Women's Running Roundup 11/03/2019

Whilst Tokyo Marathon last weekend had a faster top three with the podium all coming in under 2:21:05, the Women’s only Nagoya Marathon lived up to its normal standard of being a more competitive race, with the top 10 all within 2:25:25 (compared to 2:31:19 for Tokyo). Kenyans Jepkesho and Jemili mad moves at the 25k mark after the pacers dropped out. Namibian Johannes worked her way up to overtake them just after 39k and went on to set a new Namibian record. Full IAAF report here: https://www.iaaf.org/news/report/nagoya-lake-biwa-barcelona-big-half-marathon

1. Helalia JOHANNES, NAM 2:25:25 (3 min positive split after going halfway in 1:11:18)
2. Visiline JEPKESHO, KEN 2:22:58
3. Valary JEMELI, KEN, 2:23:01


Other notable performances were from Sara Dossena of Italy (https://www.instagram.com/sara_dossena) who ran an all-or-nothing race to come 7th in 2:24:00 after failing to start at the Maraguma Half marathon back in February. Also on top form, Rachel Cliff (https://www.instagram.com/raecliff) of Canada who broke the previous Canadian record of 2:28:00 set by Lanni Marchant in 2013, running 2:26:56 to finish 15th. There were no GBR athletes in the elite start.

Screenshot 2019-03-13 at 20.06.46.png

Now that these two big races are over, places for Japan’s Olympic Trials qualifying race, The Marathon Grand Championship, are pretty much decided. It’s a similar deal to the US Olympic Trials race in Altlanta, which we talked about last week but with tougher times to hit.

As Japan Running News explains, the criteria to get a shot at the trials are:

  • Between Aug. 1, 2017 and Apr. 30, 2019, on any IAAF-certified world record-eligible course

    • sub 2:24:00 (compared to 2:37:00 or 2:45:00 for the USA A and B levels)

      OR

    • averaging under 2:28:00 in their two fastest record-eligible races within the same window


      OH, and you can also get in these ways too…



    • Top three if under 2:28:00 + the next three if under 2:27:00 at the 2018 and 2019 Osaka International Women's Marathon and Nagoya Women's Marathon

    • Top three under 2:29:00 + next three if under 2:28:00.at 2017 and 2018 Saitama International Marathon

    • 1st place if under 2:32:00 + next five if under 2:30:00 at the 2017 and 2018 Hokkaido Marathon

    • Placing within the top eight at the 2017 London World Championships

    • Any medal at the 2018 Jakarta Asian Games

You can see the current list of qualifiers here pre- Nagoya 2019 http://www.mgc42195.jp/finalist/

So, for Nagoya, Reia Iwade has nabbed a place dipping under the qualifying time by 8 seconds to place 5th and 1st Japanese runner. Additionally The bonus ‘top three…blah blah’ rule means that Kayoko FUKUSHI (2:24:09) and Miyuki UEHARA (2:24:19) get a spot, as do Sairi MAEDA (2:25:25), Mizuki TANIMOTO (2:25:28), Aya IKEMITSU (2:26:07) because it was a generally fast race. That brings the total number of qualifying women to 14, 8 of whom have also cleared the recently announcer IAAF Olympic qualifying standards.

Full results for Nagoya are here http://womens-marathon.nagoya/__assets/_womens/pdf/result/2019_result.pdf

By the way, single sex marathons are common in Japan and there was a Men’s only race at Lake Biwa, Otsu, on the same day.

THE ZURICH BARCELONA MARATHON (IAAF Bronze), SPAIN
1 Kuftu Tahir 2:24:44 ETH
2 Josephine Chepkoech 2:25:29 KEN
3 Joy Kemuna 2:25:34 KZN

Holly Rush showed that her trail legs can handle the road too, coming 11th in 02:47:23 with Helen Hayes (London City AC) and Amy Sarkies (Rugby and Northampton AC https://twitter.com/SarkiesAmy) coming in the top 20 for GB as well.

Full results at https://media.aws.iaaf.org/competitiondocuments/pdf/6597/CompetitionResults6597.pdf?v=734106626

THE VITALITY BIG HALF, LONDON, UK

Screenshot 2019-03-13 at 20.35.01.png

While in the men’s race, the lead three sat as a pack until the final 400m and then sprinted for the finish, the women’s race was interesting in a different way. Steph Twell went out with intent as she always does, leading the race with Charlotte Purdue early on before striding ahead. Purdue and Charlotte Arter ended up running alone a lot on a VERY windy day, so for Purdue to work her way back a few miles before the end to overtake Twell decisively was even more impressive. Halyey Carruthers continues her amazing rise with a nearly 4 min PB and 4th place. Lily Partridge is still battling sciatica issue and will be hoping to get them sorted before London in just over a month’s time.

Screenshot 2019-03-13 at 20.35.56.png

Full results https://www.thebighalf.co.uk/results/2019/

HUAWEI ROMAOSTIA HALF MARATHON (IAAF Gold)
1. Lonah Salpeter, ISR, 1:06:40
2. Diana Kipyokei, KEN 1:07:13
3. Antonina Kwambai KEN 1:07:50
Lucy Marland of Cardiff AC came 14th in 1:19:53

Full results https://media.aws.iaaf.org/competitiondocuments/pdf/6595/CompetitionResults6595.pdf?v=1786850879

IN OTHER NEWS

There’s a big old debate going on about the IAAF’s decision to scrap 5k and 10k races from the Diamon League series. Oh and they’ve announced the 2020 Olympic qualifying criteria too. summary: it’s tough. https://www.iaaf.org/competition/standards/2020

Steve magness reacted:


You can see Adharanand Finn’’s piece at Fast Running here

and read ex-5k professional runner Lauren Fleshman’s tweets here




PREVIEWS

NYC HALF MARATHON


Canadian Running reports:

The 2019 United Airlines NYC Half-Marathon has a truly star-studded lineup. Canadian marathon record holder Cam Levins and 2015 Pan Am Games medallist Sasha Gollish will toe the line against some of the best distance runners in the world on Sunday, March 17

They’ll be joining Des Linden on the start line as well as the half marathon world record holder, Joyciline Jepkosgei and two-time marathon world champion Edna Kiplagat. There will be coverage on twitter https://twitter.com/nyrr


Top Professional Athletes - Women's Open Division   
AthleteCountryPersonal BestTwitter
Meseret Ali BasaETH1:15:35 
Emma BatesUSA1:11:45@emmajbates
Brittany CharboneauUSA1:15:38 
Sarah CrouchUSA1:11:31@SarahCrouch89
Marisa CummingsUSA1:17:27 
Sarah CummingsUSA1:13:11@sarahcummings
Sinke DessieETH1:12:20 
Sydney DevoreUSA1:14:21@devoresydney
Buze DiribaETH1:06:50 
Birtukan FenteETH1:11:11 
Lindsay FlanaganUSA1:12:05@lflanagan242
Erika FluehrUSA1:15:46 
Kathryn FluehrUSA1:14:01 
Bose GemedaETH1:16:52 
Sasha GollishCAN1:11:05@SGollishRuns
Danna HerrickUSA1:12:55@dkherrick
Veronica JacksonUSA1:18:11 
Joyciline JepkosgeiKEN1:04:51 
Ana JohnsonUSA1:18:14 
Katie KellnerUSA1:14:41@ktkellner
Allie KiefferUSA1:10:40@AllieKieffer
Edna KiplagatKEN1:07:41@KiplagatEdna
Nina LauwaertBEL1:11:50 
Michele LeeUSA1:13:35@malee2358
Des LindenUSA1:10:34@des_linden
Dot McMahanUSA1:11:50 
Angela OrtizUSA1:19:33 
Samantha PalmerUSA1:12:32 
Sarah PeaseUSA1:13:39@spease31
Madai PerezMEX1:09:45 
Lauren PerkinsUSA1:16:59 
Beverly RamosPUR1:12:09 
Sarah SellersUSA1:14:27@sarahwhosellers
Kellyn TaylorUSA1:10:16@kellyn_taylor
Lauren TottenUSA1:12:01@LaurenLoveRun
Annemarie TuxburyUSA1:14:19 
Eva VrabcovaCZE1:11:01@evavrabcova
Mary WaceraKEN1:06:29 
Becky WadeUSA1:11:15@bexwade89
Alice WrightGBR1:13:17@AliceWright01